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WEBINAR THIN-FILM SOLAR TECHNOLOGY
ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION FOR THIN-FILM SOLAR

Atomic Layer Deposition for thin-film solar

In this sixth Solliance webinar, we focus on atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique is developing fast and can create ultra-thin layers with high accuracy, which maybe crucial for reliability of flexible, thin film solar. We will discuss the development new functional layers for photovoltaic applications and the challenges for scaling up (spatial) ALD roll-to-roll and sheet-to-sheet deposition processes, to meet the industrial standards.

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Atomic Layer Deposition for thin-film solar

In this sixth Solliance webinar, we focus on atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique is developing fast and can create ultrathin layers with high accuracy, which maybe crucial for reliability of flexible, thin film solar. We will discuss the development new functional layers for photovoltaic applications and the challenges for scaling up (spatial) ALD roll-to-roll and sheet-to-sheet deposition processes, to meet the industrial standards.

25 January 2021

09:00 CET

Brussels

16:00 CST

Shanghai

17:00 JST

Tokyo

Registration Free

Adriana Creatore

Adriana Creatore is Professor in the Plasma and Materials Processing group. Her research, built upon the knowledge and expertise in low pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of thin films, now includes other deposition approaches, such as initiated-CVD and atomic layer deposition (ALD). Currently, Adriana is focusing her research on atomic scale processing for next generation energy technologies. The aim is to design and engineer thin films and interfaces at the nanoscale by means of atomic layer deposition, toward efficient and selective transport of charges in next generation of energy conversion and storage technologies. Selected examples are thin film (e.g. organo-metal halide perovskite) solar cells, photo-electrocatalytic cells (e.g. sun-driven fuel production) and 3D all- solid state batteries (e.g. Li-ion based). These application areas are investigated in close collaboration with international academic partners, research institutes and industry.

Paul Poodt

Paul Poodt started working at TNO in 2007 after receiving his Ph.D. in physics at the Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. In 2009, he joined the newly formed Spatial Atomic Layer Deposition team at TNO as lead process scientist and was involved in several spatial ALD process- and equipment development projects, including Spatial ALD for c-Si solar cell passivation and roll-to-roll ALD for encapsulation and barriers. He is one of the co-initiators of TNO’s spin-off company SoLayTec. Since 2013 he is leading the Spatial ALD research program at Holst Centre, developing Spatial ALD technology for large-area and flexible electronics in close collaboration with industry and academia. Paul is also CTO of TNO’s spin-off company SALDtech and part-time associate professor at the Eindhoven University of Technology.

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